The Linnean Society of NSW

 

FOUNDED 1874. INCORPORATED 1884. 'NATURAL HISTORY IN ALL ITS BRANCHES.'

Coming Events

Meetings are held at 6 pm, in the Classroom, Royal Botanic Gardens.
Enter through the gate to the Herbarium Carpark, on Mrs. Macquaries Road.
Drinks will be served from 5.30 pm. Everyone welcome.
For Security reasons, there is now a locked gate between the carpark and the Classroom.
If it is locked when you come to a lecture, just wait and someone will come and let you in.

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Wednesday 21 May
  A/PROF ANGELA MOLES
School of Biological, Earth and environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales
RAPID EVOLUTION IN INTRODUCED SPECIES: WILL WEEDS IN NEW ZEALAND AND AUSTRALIA EVENTUALLY BE ACCEPTED AS UNIQUE NATIVE TAXA?

  Angela in the field

Introducing species to a new environment creates excellent conditions for evolution. The species is released from its native enemies. It is also exposed to a new suite of biotic pressures from herbivores, pollinators, pathogens and competitors, and a new suite of abiotic pressures such as different rainfall, temperature, disturbance regime, soil fertility. Our work with herbarium specimens collected over the last 150 years has shown that 65% of the short-lived, sexually reproducing plant species introduced to Australia and 33% of the species introduced to New Zealand have undergone significant morphological change in at least one trait since their introduction. Glasshouse experiments suggest that differences between source and introduced populations are retained when they are grown in common conditions. As gene flow between introduced populations and their source populations is extremely limited, it seems inevitable that introduced species will eventually evolve to become unique new taxa. At this point, we will have to decide whether to accept them as new native species, or try to exterminate them. While most ecologists don’t like the idea yet, I think acceptance of introduced species is just a matter of time.
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Wednesday 23 July
  DR. JUDITH FIELD
School of Biological, Earth and environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales
PLANT USE THROUGH TIME IN THE HIGHLANDS OF NEW GUINEA

  Starch Grains

Dr. Field and colleagues study plant microfossils, such as starch and phytoliths, found in cultural sediments and on stone tools to determine plant use. They are looking at the way plants have been used through time from initial colonization through to the Holocene.
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Wednesday 22 October
  Prof MARTIN VAN KRANENDONK
School of Biological, Earth and environmental Sciences, University of New South Wales
EARLY LIFE ON EARTH: EVIDENCE FOR A DIVERSE BIOSPHERE 3.5 BILLION YEARS AGO

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